Introduction to Fantomina

Dublin Core

Title

Introduction to Fantomina

Subject

Introduction to Fantomina, Annotations, 18th Century Mind

Description

This is an in depth analysis of the introduction to Fantomina. My annotations highlight the social structure of the 18th century as described by the author of Fantomina. Location, appearance, and attitude are examples of highlights of social class that indicated the state of the 18th century as described by Eliza Haywood.

Creator

Eliza Haywood

Source

Haywood, Eliza. “Fantomina.” Contributed by Laura Dziuban and Mary Mark Ockerbloom, Celebration of Women Writers, BUILD-A-BOOK, digital.library.upenn.edu/women/haywood/fantomina/fantomina.html.

Publisher

BUILD-A-BOOK

Date

1693-1756

Contributor

Gray Simmons

Rights

Rights reserved under fair use laws.

Relation

-https://enlightenmens.lmc.gatech.edu/items/show/296
-https://enlightenmens.lmc.gatech.edu/items/show/335
-https://enlightenmens.lmc.gatech.edu/items/show/264
-https://enlightenmens.lmc.gatech.edu/items/show/313
-"maze, n.1." OED Online, Oxford University Press, December 2019,
www.oed.com/view/Entry/115347. Accessed 12 February 2020.
-"creature, n." OED Online, Oxford University Press, December 2019,
www.oed.com/view/Entry/44082. Accessed 12 February 2020.

Format

Electronic Publication

Language

English

Type

Novel

Text Item Type Metadata

Text

FANTOMINA:
OR,
LOVE in a Maze.
"A YOUNG Lady of distinguished Birth, Beauty, Wit, and Spirit, happened to be in a Box one Night at the Playhouse; where, though there were a great Number of celebrated Toasts, she perceived several Gentlemen extremely pleased themselves with entertaining a Woman who sat in a Corner of the Pit, and, by her Air and Manner of receiving them, might easily be known to be one of those who come there for no other Purpose, than to create Acquaintance with as many as seem desirous of it…”
“…This excited a Curiosity in her to know in what Manner these Creatures were address'd:– She was young, a Stranger to the World, and consequently to the Dangers of it; and having no Body in Town, at that Time, to whom she was oblig'd to be accountable for her Actions, did in every Thing as her Inclinations or Humours render'd most agreeable to her: Therefore thought it not in the least a Fault to put in practice a little Whim which came immediately into her Head, to dress herself as near as she could in the Fashion of those Women who make sale of their Favours, and set herself in the Way of being accosted as such a one, having at that Time no other Aim, than the Gratification of an innocent Curiosity.

Original Format

Electronic Document

Citation

Eliza Haywood, “Introduction to Fantomina,” Enlightenmens, accessed April 6, 2020, https://enlightenmens.lmc.gatech.edu/items/show/379.

Output Formats