Micrographia

Dublin Core

Title

Micrographia

Description

From The British Library, Robert Hooke (1635–1703) was not only a scientist, he was a mapmaking pioneer, architect, astronomer, biologist and ingenious experimenter. He was a founding member and ‘curator of experiments’ at the Royal Society, an academy at the cutting edge of scientific discovery in Britain.

This book, Micrographia, was the first important work on microscopy, the study of minute objects through a microscope. First published in 1665, it contains large-scale, finely detailed illustrations of some of the specimens Hooke viewed under the microscopes he designed. At the end of the book, there are observations of the stars and moon as seen through a telescope.

By changing our perspective, Hooke gives power and beauty to things that might otherwise be dismissed as disgusting or trivial – the surface of frozen urine, the eye of a grey drone-fly, a piece of moss, the body of a louse, an ant or a flea. Alongside the engravings, he writes entertaining accounts of his observations. Hooke is witty and even poetic, using similes to help us imagine the world he sees through his lenses.

Creator

Robert Hooke

Source

The British Library

Publisher

The British Library

Date

1665

Contributor

Bryce Malone

Rights

The British Library

Format

Book

Language

English

Identifier

435.e.19.

Files

Micro 1.jpg
micro 2.jpg
micro 3.jpg
micro 4.jpg

Citation

Robert Hooke, “Micrographia,” Enlightenmens, accessed December 4, 2022, http://enlightenmens.lmc.gatech.edu/items/show/890.

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