Excerpt from The Vicar of Wakefield, A Tale Supposed to be written by Himself

Dublin Core

Title

Excerpt from The Vicar of Wakefield, A Tale Supposed to be written by Himself

Subject

Sentimental novels

Description

An excerpt from Chapter 2 The Vicar of Wakefield
which captures the sentimental experience of courtship through an account of the daily routine led by the involved families

Creator

Goldsmith, Oliver

Source

Goldsmith, Oliver. "The Vicar of Wakefield, A Tale Supposed to be written by Himself", R. Collins, 1766, Chapter 2. https://www.gutenberg.org/files/2667/2667-h/2667-h.htm

Publisher

R. Collins

Date

1766

Contributor

m4cb3th

Relation

Pamela, or Virtue Rewarded by Samuel Richardson

Tristan Shandy by Laurence Sterne

Format

Web page

Language

English

Type

Sentimental novel

Text Item Type Metadata

Text

Her youth, health, and innocence, were still heightened by a complexion so transparent, and such an happy sensibility of look, as even age could not gaze on with indifference. As Mr Wilmot knew that I could make a very handsome settlement on my son, he was not averse to the match; so both families lived together in all that harmony which generally precedes an expected alliance. Being convinced by experience that the days of courtship are the most happy of our lives, I was willing enough to lengthen the period; and the various amusements which the young couple every day shared in each other’s company, seemed to encrease their passion. We were generally awaked in the morning by music, and on fine days rode a hunting. The hours between breakfast and dinner the ladies devoted to dress and study: they usually read a page, and then gazed at themselves in the glass, which even philosophers might own often presented the page of greatest beauty.

Original Format

Web page

Citation

Goldsmith, Oliver, “Excerpt from The Vicar of Wakefield, A Tale Supposed to be written by Himself,” Enlightenmens, accessed July 5, 2022, http://enlightenmens.lmc.gatech.edu/items/show/568.

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