An Excerpt from Hume's "A Treatise of Human Nature"

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Title

An Excerpt from Hume's "A Treatise of Human Nature"

Subject

A quote from "A Treatise of Human Nature" which describes an ability of people to sympathise with one another.

Description

This quote support Smith's point that humans are able to experience a "fellow-feeling" for others: we come to "conceive or to be affected by what he[another person] feels." Hume is suggesting that minds of men have the ability to reflect each others emotions, like mirrors, but the degree of these passions may decay significantly, which reinforces Smith's idea that when people empathise with another person, their experience is more moderate than what the person in the particular situation feels.

Creator

David Hume

Source

David Hume, A Treatise of Human Nature. Being an Attempt to Introduce the Experimental Method of Reasoning into Moral Subjects. 3 vols., Mind Is a Metaphor, (Printed for John Noon, 1739)

Publisher

The Mind is a Metaphor

Date

1739

Contributor

Valeriia Rubanova

Relation

Smith, "The Theory of Moral Sentiments"

Format

text

Language

English

Type

Text

Identifier

http://metaphors.iath.virginia.edu/metaphors/24106

Text Item Type Metadata

Text

"In general we may remark, that the minds of men are mirrors to one another, not only because they reflect each others emotions, but also because those rays of passions, sentiments and opinions may be often reverberated, and may decay away by insensible degrees."

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Citation

David Hume, “An Excerpt from Hume's "A Treatise of Human Nature",” Enlightenmens, accessed November 29, 2022, http://enlightenmens.lmc.gatech.edu/items/show/467.

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