Why Facts Don't Change Our Minds

Dublin Core

Title

Why Facts Don't Change Our Minds

Subject

The article explaining how and why humans have developed the capacity for reason.

Description

The article suggests that reason has developed "not to enable us to solve abstract, logical problems or even to help us draw conclusions from unfamiliar data; rather, it developed to resolve the problems posed by living in collaborative groups." It suggests that often human will abandon rational reasoning in favour of their long-held beliefs, because the capacity to reason evolved not to be able to present logical reasoning behind an idea but to win an argument with others. The article supports Smith's point that a man will approve of another person passions if they entirely sympathise with these ideas; and on the other hand, they will disapprove of those with whom they do not agree.

Creator

Elizabeth Kolbert

Source

Kolbert, Elizabeth. “Why Facts Don't Change Our Minds.” The New Yorker, The New Yorker, 20 Feb. 2017

Publisher

The New Yorker

Date

February 20, 2017

Contributor

Valeriia Rubanova

Relation

Smith, "The Theory of Moral Sentiments"

Format

text/html

Language

English

Type

Text

Identifier

www.newyorker.com/magazine/2017/02/27/why-facts-dont-change-our-minds?utm_campaign=likeshopme&client_service_id=31202&utm_social_type=owned&utm_brand=tny&service_user_id=1.78e+16&utm_content=instagram-bio-link&utm_source=instagram&utm_medium=social&client_service_name=the new yorker&supported_service_name=instagram_publishing.

Website Item Type Metadata

Citation

Elizabeth Kolbert, “Why Facts Don't Change Our Minds,” Enlightenmens, accessed August 9, 2022, http://enlightenmens.lmc.gatech.edu/items/show/462.

Output Formats