What people cured of blindness see

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Title

What people cured of blindness see

Subject

Vision restoration and answer to a centuries old philosophical question

Description

In his essay, Locke mentions simple ideas of one sense: the ideas of Sensation which are received from one of the senses and could not be derived from any of others. Noted in the essay, the Molyneux problem was posed: "if a man born blind can feel the differences between shapes such as spheres and cubes, could he, if given the ability to see, distinguish those objects by sight alone, in reference to the tactile schemata he already possessed?"
In early 21th century, the sight-restoration surgeries have appeared, and the Molyneux problem finally received its answer: a blind person with restored vision can not distinguish between objects using only sight even though they have touched it previously.

Creator

Patrick House

Source

House, Patrick. “What People Cured of Blindness See.” The New Yorker, The New Yorker, 28 Aug. 2014

Publisher

The New Yorker

Date

2014

Contributor

Valeriia Rubanova

Relation

Locke, "An Essay Concerning Human Understanding"

Format

text/html

Language

English

Type

Text

Identifier

www.newyorker.com/tech/annals-of-technology/people-cured-blindness-see

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Tags

Citation

Patrick House, “What people cured of blindness see,” Enlightenmens, accessed August 8, 2022, http://enlightenmens.lmc.gatech.edu/items/show/303.

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